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Romeo Giovanni

Romeo Giovanni

Baritone GM ART & MUSIC
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GM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSICGM ART & MUSIC
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni
Romeo Giovanni

The Milanese bass-baritone Giovanni Romeo is one of the Italian talents who have established themselves on the most important opera stages worldwide, such as Teatro alla Scala, Vienna State Opera, Bolshoi Theatre, Atlanta Opera, Opéra de Monte-Carlo, Deutsche Oper Berlin, NCPA in Beijing, ABAO Olbe in Bilbao, Opéra Grand Avignon, Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb, Royal Opera House Muscat, and many others.

He began his studies in opera singing at the age of fifteen with soprano Cristina Dominguez, and he  improved his skills at the Teatro alla Scala Academy, thanks to the special “Paolo Montarsolo” scholarship.

He began his career with the “Laboratorio lirico del 700” at the Bibiena Theatre in Mantua debuting as Uberto in Paisiello’s La Serva Padrona and as Geronimo in Cimarosa’s Il Matrimonio Segreto, under the direction of the famous comic bass Enzo Dara, with whom he specialized in comic roles; many consider him as his artistic heir.

Afterwards, he debuted many Mozart and Donizetti roles, both as bass and as baritone buffo, thanks to his vocal extension and flexibility. He took part in some of the most important international opera projects for young singers such as the “Young Singer Project” in Salzburg.

But the real success for came with Dr. Bartolo from Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia; a role that Giovanni Romeo has played many times (over 60 official performances) and that has led him to perform on the major opera houses in Italy and abroad. Among these, Jean Pierre Ponnelle’s famed production at Teatro alla Scala, in which he joined Leo Nucci and Ruggero Raimondi.

Among his signature funny roles, Leporello in Don Giovanni, Don Magnifico in La Cenerentola, the title role in Don Pasquale, and Dr. Dulcamara in L’Elisir d’Amore. But his vocal and dramatic versatility ranges as far as Schaunard in Puccini’s La Bohème and Sancho Panza in Massenet’s Don Quichotte.

Most recently, he debuted as Prosdocimo in Il turco in Italia at Opéra de Monte-Carlo, with Cecilia Bartoli.

He has worked with prestigious conductors such as  Antonello Allemandi, Gianluca Capuano, Riccardo Chailly, Arthur Fagen, Gabriele Ferro, Gerard Korsten, Pier Giorgio Morandi, Carlo Rizzi, Federico Maria Sardelli, Speranza Scapucci, Tugan Sokhiev, and with important directors such as Grischa Asagaroff, Renaud Doucet & André Barbe, Jean-Louis Grinda, Gino Landi, Mario Martone, Evdeny Pisarev, Gabriele Salvatores, Mario Pontiggia, Michael Shell, and many others.

Upcoming plans include Sagrestano in a concert version of Tosca at Opéra de Monte-Carlo, Bartolo in Le nozze di Figaro at Teatro Regio di Torino.

More info: Operabase
General Management 

Gianluca Macheda
Grzybowska 43a, lok. 72 00-855
Warsaw Poland
gmacheda@gmartandmusic.com

Logistics 

Martina Biagini
Via Romana 578/B 55100 Lucca Italy
+39 3479762848
mbiagini@gmartandmusic.com

Reviews

“Comme à Monte-Carlo, la basse Giovanni Romeo incarne le poète. Admirable comédien et chanteur, il anime, commente et manipule ses personnages, qui s’animent sous nos yeux. Sa conduite du chant traduit une profonde intelligence du rôle, comme du texte. La voix est superlative, homogène, parfaitement rossinienne.”
Yvan Beuvard, ForumOpera.com 

“Perhaps the funniest is Giovanni Romeo, making his U.S. debut. The Milanese bass-baritone has played at Teatro alla Scala in Milan, the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, and ABAO in Bilbao, among others. He brings not only a breadth of singing talent, but also comedic timing.”
Jonathan Shipley, ARTSATL 

“[…] Giovanni Romeo, Barone di Trombonok sicuro sia nel canto che nella recitazione.”
Alessandro Cammarano, OperaClick 

“Convincente sia vocalmente che interpretativamente il don Bartolo di Giovanni Romeo.”
Danilo Boaretto, OperaClick 

“Saturday night’s opening night performance will be referenced to future opera goers as the United States and Atlanta Opera debut of bass-baritone Giovanni Romeo, entrusted here with the role of Doctor Bartolo. For all intents and purposes, the night belonged to him. Vocally, his instrument is malleable and responsive in loud, soft and ornate passages. Wielded by Mr. Romeo, this voice can both bloom beautifully and distort itself to express the passions of the ridiculous assignment. His aria “A un dottor de la mia sorte” does not enjoying the same fame as other numbers in the opera, but can prove particularly testing in its mix of sustained singing, legato, and patter outbursts, which Mr. Romeo executed with expert measure and comedic verve. Dramatically, he is a scene stealer like Mr. Stayton, though he achieved this through subtler means: A slight change in position, or a well-time silence allowed him to redirected the spotlight to himself at every turn. This is not to say that he was above the more overt antics, for he was able to successfully land the interpolated side business of doctor Bartolo’s split persona as a rooster for the entirety of the show. There was even a rooster ballet which accompanied the tempest interlude in act two and it was entirely hilarious! In the hands of Mr. Romeo, his Bartolo was ultimately realized pedantic and pathetic through a Falstaffian reading. It elevated the character well beyond the stock figure treatment we are often accustomed to and inspired disappointment in many when Doctor Bartolo doesn’t end up with the girl at the end.”

Daniel Vasquez, newoutpost.com